When Are IRA Contributions Tax Deductible?

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Contributions to a traditional IRA are tax deductible if you don’t already participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. For 2015, the maximum you can contribute to an IRA is $5,500. If you are age 50 or over, you can make an additional “catch-up contribution” of $1,000.

If you do participate in an employer-sponsored plan, your contributions still can be fully or partially deductible, up to certain income thresholds. For 2015, those limits are between $61,000 and $71,000 for single filers and $98,000 and $118,000 for married couples filing joint returns.

If you are ineligible to make deductible contributions to a traditional IRA, you may want to investigate a Roth IRA. Contributions to a Roth IRA are made with after-tax dollars and are not tax deductible, but distributions are tax free. Be aware that there are income thresholds to contribute to a Roth. For 2015, those limits are between $116,000 and $131,000 for single filers and $183,000 and $193,000 for married couples filing joint returns.

You can find more information on the IRS website.

 

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